FINE ARTS

 

Professors Kagan, Lewis; Associate Professors F. Archer, Fox; Adjunct Associate Professors Dubroff, Prevo; Assistant Professor Salvage; Lecturer M. Archer

Chair: Pamela P. Fox

The Department of Fine Arts offers two majors: Theatre and Visual Arts.

The requirement for a major in Theatre is a minimum of 32 hours, to include: Theatre 101, 201, 220, 251, 252, 253, 254, 321, 361, 401, 498, 499. Two additional dramatic literature courses from: Theatre 201, 360, English 270, 313, 314, 334, French 401, German 401, Spanish 405, 408.

The requirement for a major in Visual Arts is a minimum of 34 hours, to include: Visual Arts 200, 202, 220, 498, 499. Five classes from the following: Visual Arts 221, 222, 223, 321, 322, 323, 324, 325, 361, Theatre 401. Two additional classes from the following: Visual Arts 201, 204, 205, 208, 210, 360, Philosophy 218.

The Department of Fine Arts offers three minors: one in Music, one in Theatre, and one in the Visual Arts.

The requirements for a minor in Music are 15 credit hours; Music 220 and 221 (Music Theory I and II) are required, as is any one 300-level music class other than Music 350-353 (Theory and Practice of Choral Music) or Music 354-357 (Theory and Practice of Instrumental Ensemble Music); to complete the minor, students must take any two courses from among the following: Music 101 (Introduction to Music Literature), Music 216 (Music of the Twentieth Century), Music 217 (American Music), Music 218 (Jazz History), Music 219 (History of Opera), and Physics 135 (The Physics of Sound). Students pursuing the minor in Music are strongly encouraged to participate in two semesters of Music 250-253 (Theory and Practice of Choral Music) or Music 254-257 (Theory and Practice of Instrumental Ensemble Music).

The requirements for a minor in Theatre are 15 credit hours from the courses listed below, including at least three Theatre offerings: Theatre 101 (Introduction to Theatre), Theatre 201 (Asian Theatre), Theatre 220 (Acting), Theatre 321 (Directing), Theatre 360 (Topics in Theatre Theory and Literature), Theatre 361 (Topics in Theatre Practice), Theatre 401 (Theatre Design and Technology), English 270 (Introduction to Shakespeare), English 313 (English Drama), English 314 (Modern Drama), English 334 (Special Topics in Shakespeare), French 401 (French Theatre), German 401 (German Theatre), Spanish 405 (Twentieth Century Latin American Theatre), Spanish 408 (Theatre of the Golden Age).

The requirements for a minor in the Visual Arts are 15 credit hours from the Visual Arts courses listed below, including at least one studio, one lecture, and two 300-level courses.  Lecture courses should be chosen from the following: Visual Arts 200 (Art in the Contemporary World), Visual Arts 201 (The History of Western Art I), Visual Arts 202 (The History of Western Art II), Visual Arts 204 (Greek and Roman Art and Architecture), Visual Arts 205 (Medieval Art and Architecture), Visual Arts 208 (Western Art of 19th and 20th Centuries), Visual Arts 210 (American Photography), Visual Arts 360 (Topics in Art History). Studio courses should be chosen from the following: Visual Arts 220 (Color and Two-Dimensional Design), Visual Arts 221 (Drawing I), Visual Arts 222 (Painting I), Visual Arts 223 (Photography I), Visual Arts 321 (Drawing II), Visual Arts 322 (Painting II), Visual Arts 323 (Photography II), Visual Arts 324 (Digital Photography), Visual Arts 325 (Portraiture), Visual Arts 361 (Topics in Studio Art).

Students interested in going into arts management may want to consider Economics 101 as the prerequisite for the following helpful courses: Business 222, 231, or 241; and may also want to consult with the Chair of the Department of Fine Arts about courses in the Sweet Briar Arts Management Program.

Students interested in taking private music lessons for academic credit can do so at Longwood University by enrolling in Music 155/156, 255/256 through the Longwood University Cooperative Program.  Students are encouraged to see Professor Salvage for details.

MUSIC

MUSIC 100. (3)
FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC
. This course introduces students to the fundamentals of music notation and music theory. Students learn how to read treble and bass clefs, construct scales, identify key signatures and intervals, and write chord progressions. Students develop their ability to recognize musical structures aurally through taking musical dictation and acquiring basic keyboard skills. Prerequisite: none. Offered: each semester.

MUSIC 101. (3)
INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC LITERATURE.
The aim of this lecture course is to develop listening skills, musical understanding, and knowledge of the standard repertoire. It examines music in its historical and cultural contexts through readings, guided listening, audio-visual materials, and lecture demonstrations. No special musical knowledge or ability is required. The course is open to all students. Prerequisite: none. Offered: spring semester.

MUSIC 216. (3)
MUSIC OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY.
This lecture course provides an intensive study of the art music of the past century. Significant composers and the musical, historical, philosophical, and social contexts of their works are explored; attendance at several concerts is required. Prerequisite: none. Offered: on sufficient demand.

MUSIC 217. (3)
AMERICAN MUSIC.
This lecture course is a survey of the music of the North American colonies and the United States from the 17th century to the present. The course seeks to establish the continuity of American music with the Western European tradition while exploring the diversity of influences from other world cultures. The continuing interactions of classical, folk, and popular music, which give American music its uniqueness, are fully examined. Concert attendance is expected. Prerequisite: none. Offered: fall semester.

MUSIC 218. (3)
JAZZ HISTORY.
This lecture course is an examination of jazz as both a musical and a sociological phenomenon. The course focuses on the musical developments that resulted in the creation of jazz, the major jazz styles from New Orleans origins to the present day, the musicians who perform jazz, and the influence the art of jazz has had on other areas of music. Attendance at a local jazz concert is required. Prerequisite: none. Offered: spring semester.

MUSIC 219. (3)
HISTORY OF OPERA.
This lecture course is a study of opera from its origins in the work of the Florentine Camerata and Monteverdi, through the more familiar works of Handel, Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, and Puccini, to the contemporary creations of Carlisle Floyd, Philip Glass, John Adams, John Corigliano, William Bolcom, and John Harbison. Films and telecasts of operas are shown, and a field trip to an opera performance is organized. Prerequisite: none. Offered: fall semester.

MUSIC 220-221. (3-3)
MUSIC THEORY I and II.
These lecture courses are designed to teach the theoretical fundamentals of music as well as to refine music reading, writing, and analytical skills. Classwork regularly involves critical listening and exercises in music reading and writing. Topics include notation, scales, harmonic functions, basic counterpoint, basic musical forms, sight-reading, melodic-rhythmic dictation, and score study. Music 221, as an advanced continuation of 220, concentrates on study and analysis of the larger musical forms. Prerequisite: Music 100, or permission of the instructor. Music 220 is the normal prerequisite for Music 221. Offered: 220 in the fall semester; 221 in the spring semester.

MUSIC 360. (3)
TOPICS IN MUSIC HISTORY.
This lecture course goes into considerable depth in the selected topic, such as music for the keyboard, chamber music, opera, or the works of a single composer or stylistic period. The course emphasizes analysis and interpretation through several written reports, listening and discussion in class, and outside listening. Prerequisite: Music 101, or permission of the instructor. Offered: on sufficient demand.

MUSIC 498. (1)
PRE-THESIS STUDY. 
Students must take this course the semester before taking Music 499 (Senior Thesis) to craft the thesis project proposal and to strengthen the skills required for the thesis. The student chooses and works with the thesis advisor to develop a plan for the upcoming semester that includes the wording of the thesis proposal and efforts sufficient to convince the advisor that he is prepared to undertake the thesis project.

MUSIC 499. (3)
SENIOR THESIS.
This course involves the student in a project designed specifically to reflect his interest in the arts. In consultation with the faculty of the Fine Arts Department, and under the guidance of the appropriate member of that department, the project is undertaken in the student's senior year, and must include appropriate documentation. Prerequisites: Music 498 and senior status.

THEATRE 

THEATRE 101. (3)
INTRODUCTION TO THEATRE.
This is a general survey lecture course which aims to familiarize students with the history and practice of western theatre. Plays are studied chronologically from the Greeks to contemporary playwrights. Geographical coverage includes theatre of the world from Asia to South America. Students also participate in hands-on theatrical activities, ranging from playwriting to staging scenes. No previous theatrical experience is expected. Prerequisite: none. Offered: each semester.

THEATRE 201. (3)
ASIAN THEATRE.
This lecture course introduces students to the rich traditional theatre of various Asian countries, including India, China, and Japan. Historical and cultural analysis provides the context for detailed study of dramatic theory and scripts in translation. Students also are exposed to the different performance techniques through practical workshop sessions and video presentations. Students participate in hands-on theatrical activities, ranging from playwriting to staging scenes. No previous theatrical experience is expected. Prerequisite: none. Offered: spring semester of even-numbered years.

THEATRE 220. (3)
ACTING
. This studio course introduces students to acting, including basic proficiency in movement and vocal techniques. Students develop an approach to character and an understanding of theatre through extensive play-reading, scene work, and in-depth script analysis. The course also hones memorization, oral proficiency, and presentation skills. Prerequisite: none. The course is normally offered in the fall semester.

THEATRE 321. (3)
DIRECTING
. This studio course immerses students in the comprehensive approach to theatre required of the director. Through extensive readings, script analysis, character-delineation techniques, organizational exercises, time-management drills, and communication-strengthening approaches, students develop the skills necessary to mount a production. The semester culminates in the presentation of a one-act play festival which is open to the public. Prerequisite: Theatre 101. The course is normally offered every spring semester.

THEATRE 360. (3)
TOPICS IN THEATRE THEORY AND LITERATURE.
This lecture course explores a specific aspect of theatre with an emphasis on theory or history. The course may concentrate on a particular playwright (e.g., Shakespeare), a genre (e.g., the Comedy), or a topic interwoven with the discipline (e.g., Political Theatre). The course may examine its subjects through in-class reports, discussion, and exercises, as well as through papers and performances. Offered: in rotation with Theatre 361.

THEATRE 361. (3)
TOPICS IN THEATRE PRACTICE.
This studio course explores a specific aspect of theatre with an emphasis on performance or craft. The course may concentrate on a particular playwright (e.g., Shakespeare), a genre (e.g., the Comedy), or a topic interwoven with the discipline (e.g., Political Theatre). The course may examine its subjects through in-class reports, discussion, and exercises, as well as through papers and performances. Offered: in rotation with Theatre 360.

THEATRE 401. (3)
THEATRE DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY.
This studio course focuses on the history and evolution of design and technology from the Renaissance to the present. Students work in conjunction with the department's theatre productions to create a working knowledge in such areas as set and light design and stage craft. Each student also devises his own set designs for prominent plays from the history of theatre. Prerequisite: Theatre 101 or consent of the instructor. Offered: alternate semesters.

THEATRE 498. (1)
PRE-THESIS STUDY
. Each Theatre major must take this course the semester before taking Theatre 499 (Senior Thesis) to craft the thesis project proposal and to strengthen the skills required for the thesis. The student chooses and works with the thesis advisor to develop a plan for the upcoming semester that includes the wording of the thesis proposal and efforts sufficient to convince the advisor that he is prepared to undertake the thesis project.

THEATRE 499. (3)
SENIOR THESIS. This course involves the student in a project designed specifically to reflect his interest in the arts. In consultation with the faculty of the Fine Arts Department, and under the guidance of the appropriate member of that department, the project is undertaken in the student's senior year, and must include appropriate documentation. Prerequisites: Theatre 498 and senior status.

VISUAL ARTS

VISUAL ARTS 200. (3)
ART IN THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD
.  An introduction to visual art that covers various media used in studio art practices, develops skills in description and analysis of such works, and engages broader issues such as gallery and museum practices, cultural heritage and patrimony, and the art market. The class is conducted as a seminar, with in-class discussion and presentation of individual research.  The course is open to all students and is a requirement of the Visual Arts Major. Offered: fall semester.  Prerequisite: none.

VISUAL ARTS 201. (3)
HISTORY OF WESTERN ART I: ANCIENT TO MEDIEVAL.
This introductory lecture course surveys the artistic traditions of ancient and medieval Europe framed against the art and architecture of ancient Near East and Egypt. Students examine representative works in their historical contexts and consider the ways art and architecture function as carriers of cultural meaning. Prerequisite: none. Offered: fall semester.

VISUAL ARTS 202. (3)
HISTORY OF WESTERN ART II: RENAISSANCE TO MODERN.
This introductory lecture course surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture in Europe and America from the early Italian Renaissance to the middle of the twentieth-century. Students examine representative works in their historical contexts and consider the ways art and architecture function as carriers of cultural meaning. Prerequisite: none. Offered: spring semester.

VISUAL ARTS 204. (3)
GREEK AND ROMAN ART AND ARCHITECTURE. An introductory survey to the art and architecture of ancient Greece and Rome. The course begins with an introduction to the Bronze Age cultures of the Aegean and then concentrates on Greece from the Geometric through Hellenistic periods and on Rome from the Late Republic to the Late Empire including the period of the early Christian church under the patronage of the
Emperor Constantine. Prerequisite: Western Culture 101 or Visual Arts 201, or permission of the instructor. Offered: spring semester of odd-numbered years.

VISUAL ARTS 205. (3)
MEDIEVAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE.
This lecture course focuses on the architecture, sculpture, painting, and decorative arts produced in Europe between the fourth century and the early fourteenth century. While principally a survey of ecclesiastical architecture, it also includes castles and fortifications. Emphasis is on the construction, composition, and iconography of the monuments so that students develop skills in visual analysis and interpretation. Prerequisite: Western Culture 102 or Visual Arts 201, or permission of the instructor. Offered: fall semester of odd-numbered years.

VISUAL ARTS 208. (3)
WESTERN ART OF THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES.
This lecture course focuses on the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Europe and North America in the modern age, presented in the context of contemporaneous philosophical thought and historical events. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 200, 202, or permission of instructor.

VISUAL ARTS 210. (3)
AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPHY.
This lecture course examines American photographic representation from mid-19th-century experimental processes to the current digital age. The study of the role of photography in the United States is used to explore themes in the arts, social and political history, popular culture, and personal expression. Readings, discussion, portfolio viewings, oral and written reports, and visits to photographic exhibitions compose the course of study. Prerequisite: none. Offered: spring semester of odd-numbered years.

VISUAL ARTS 220. (3)
COLOR AND TWO-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN.
This is a studio course which introduces and explores the use of color theory and the visual elements of line, shape, value, texture, and space in the visual arts and design. Drawing skills are not emphasized, though they would not be a disadvantage. Projects and problem solving include both fine arts assignments and graphic design applications. Students enrolling in this course will be charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: none.

VISUAL ARTS 221. (3)
DRAWING I.
This is a studio course, concerned with the development of basic rendering (such as linear perspective and contour drawing) in accordance with the concepts of art. Students enrolling in this course will be charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: none. Offered: each semester.

VISUAL ARTS 222. (3)
PAINTING I
. This introductory-level studio course stresses technical skills and includes color theory, panel and canvas construction and preparation, and instruction in both direct and indirect painting techniques. Students create several paintings during the semester. There is a lab fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: none.

VISUAL ARTS 223. (3)
PHOTOGRAPHY I.
This is a studio course, with projects and readings that explore both the history and aesthetics of photography as a fine art. Along with instruction in using a 35mm camera and processing and printing photographs, this course deals with the sharpening of visual perception and emphasizes the creative use of photographic technique. Students enrolling in this course will be charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: none. Offered: each semester.

VISUAL ARTS 321. (3)
DRAWING II.
This is a studio course that focuses upon identifying style, improving visual memory, working on a large scale, and using varied drawing materials. Students enrolling in this course will be charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 221. Offered: spring semester alternating with Visual Arts 325.

VISUAL ARTS 322. (3)
PAINTING II
. This intermediate-level studio course is an expansion upon Painting I, with assignments that look for more mastery of basic painting skills to further image sophistication and complexity.  There is a lab fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 222. 

VISUAL ARTS 323. (3)
PHOTOGRAPHY II.
This studio course explores photography as a visual language. Projects help students to develop their capacity for creative thinking and communication. Topics include montage, digital imaging, photographic mixed media, fiber-base printing, and print-toning. Students create a self-directed project and develop a portfolio of images. Students enrolling in this course will be charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 223, or permission of the instructor. Offered: spring semester.

VISUAL ARTS 324. (3)
DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY.
This studio course explores the aesthetic, conceptual and technical aspects of digital image making. Students develop proficiency using a digital camera and working with image editing software. Digital photographic techniques such as workflow, digital darkroom, image manipulation, and digital printmaking are addressed. Students work with color and learn basic color theory as it relates to photographic imagery. Students enrolling in this course are charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 223, or permission of the instructor. Offered: fall semester.

VISUAL ARTS 325. (3)
PORTRAITURE
. This is a studio class that involves both drawing and oil painting. Topics and assignments include a brief history of the portrait, the anatomy of the head, portrait-drawing, and at least one portrait painting. There is some use of photography, so students need not feel that they must be accomplished artists. Students enrolling in this course will be charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: Visual Arts 221, or permission of instructor. Offered: spring semester, alternating with Visual Arts 321.

VISUAL ARTS 360. (3)
TOPICS IN ART HISTORY.
This lecture course focuses on a specific topic in visual art, either of a specific period or style or discipline (e.g., Renaissance Art or early Christian Art, architecture, or decorative arts). The course emphasizes analysis and interpretation through written reports, observation, and discussion. Appropriate field trips may be undertaken. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Offered: in rotation with Visual Arts 361.

VISUAL ARTS 361. (3)
TOPICS IN STUDIO ART.
This studio course focuses on a specific studio discipline (documentary photography or digital art). The course emphasizes analysis and interpretation through examination of practices and portfolio development. Observation, discussion, and reports are also a part of the class. Appropriate field trips may be undertaken. Students enrolling in this course will be charged an additional fee to cover the cost of materials. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Offered: in rotation with Visual Arts 360.

VISUAL ARTS 498. (1)
PRE-THESIS STUDY
. Each Visual Arts major must take this course the semester before taking Visual Arts 499 (Senior Thesis) to craft the thesis project proposal and to strengthen the skills required for the thesis. The student chooses and works with the thesis advisor to develop a plan for the upcoming semester that includes the wording of the thesis proposal and efforts sufficient to convince the advisor that he is prepared to undertake the thesis project.

VISUAL ARTS 499. (3)
SENIOR THESIS
. This course involves the student in a project designed specifically to reflect his interest in the arts. In consultation with the faculty of the Fine Arts Department, and under the guidance of the appropriate member of that department, the project is undertaken in the student's senior year, and must include appropriate documentation. Prerequisites: Visual Arts 498 and senior status.

PERFORMANCE STUDIES

Within the Fine Arts Department is the general course area of Performance Studies. These courses can be identified by their numbering, which falls between 250 and 280 for the classes which count toward graduation and between 350 and 380 for the classes which do not count toward graduation.

All performance courses have the following in common: They are offered every semester; the classroom experience culminates in public performance(s); attendance is a necessary part of fulfilling the course requirements; students study the material for performance in the context of its period(s) and its critical reception, with attention to the terms and special considerations necessary for its appreciation; each student writes a paper upon an aspect of performance or the material used in performance, or takes an examination upon the same; grading is based on attendance and class participation, quality and effort in performance, and the paper or exam; in each course, 1 hour of academic credit can be earned; up to six 200-level performance courses can be taken for up to 6 credit hours counting toward graduation; as many 300-level performance courses can be taken as a student desires, but only for load credit, since the credit for 300-level courses does not count toward graduation.

MUSIC

MUSIC 250, 251, 252, 253, 350, 351, 352, 353. (1)
THEORY AND PRACTICE OF CHORAL MUSIC.
A sequence of courses involving a thorough study and analysis, leading to performances, of masterworks from the great Western choral tradition. Integral to the course is the study of basic music theory, terminology, sight-singing, and vocal techniques, as well as application of foreign languages, history, and other arts as they relate to the specific literature of the semester. Because of the special nature of this course, it is possible to register for it late without penalty through the second full week of the semester.

MUSIC 254, 255, 256, 257, 354, 355, 356, 357. (1)
THEORY AND PRACTICE OF INSTRUMENTAL ENSEMBLE MUSIC.
The work of this performance class will culminate in the public performance of ensemble music in various venues. Also integral to the course is the study of basic music theory, terminology, sight-reading, solo techniques, and ensemble playing. Because of the special nature of this course, it is possible to register for it late without penalty through the second full week of the semester.

THEATRE

THEATRE 251, 252, 253, 254, 351, 352, 353, 354. (1)
THEATRE PRODUCTION.
The work of this class will culminate in a publicly staged theatrical production. Students may be involved in any of several aspects of production, such as acting, directing, stage managing, designing, or dramaturgy. In every case students are required to demonstrate commitment to the production process through regular attendance and seriousness of purpose. Each student writes a paper on an aspect of production in order to fulfill the requirements of the course. Because of the special nature of this course, it is possible to register for it late without penalty through the fourth full week of the semester.