Classics Courses from the Catalogue

Professor Arieti; Associate Professor Siegel; Assistant Professor Irons

Chair: Janice F. Siegel

The requirements for a major in Greek are at least 30 hours, including at least 12 hours in Greek above the 100-level (of which 6 hours must be in courses at the 300-level or above), History 271, Classical Studies 203, and the capstone course, Classical Studies 480. The additional hours may be selected from courses in Greek (at the 300-level or above), Latin, and Classical Studies; History 272; Visual Arts 204; Philosophy 210; and Government and Foreign Affairs 310.

The requirements for a major in Latin are at least 30 hours, including at least 12 hours in Latin above the 100-level (of which 6 hours must be in courses at the 300-level or above), History 272, Classical Studies 204, and the capstone course, Classical Studies 480. The additional hours may be selected from courses in Latin (at the 300-level or above), Greek, and Classical Studies; History 271; Visual Arts 204; Philosophy 210; and Government and Foreign Affairs 310.

The requirements for a major in Greek and Latin are at least 36 hours, including at least 12 hours in each language (of which 6 hours must be in courses at the 300-level or above), History 271 and 272, Classical Studies 203 and 204, and the capstone course, Classical Studies 480. The additional hours may be selected from courses in the Greek and Latin languages (at the 300-level or above); courses in Classical Studies; Visual Arts 204; Philosophy 210, and Government and Foreign Affairs 310.

The requirements for a major in Classical Studies are at least 30 hours, including at least 6 hours of Greek or Latin above the 100-level, and the capstone course, Classical Studies 480. The additional hours may be selected from courses in the Greek and Latin languages (if these are in the language used to satisfy the language portion of this major, they must be at the 300-level or above); courses in Classical Studies; History 271, 272; Visual Arts 204; Philosophy 210; and Government and Foreign Affairs 310.

For any of the majors, in the second semester of the junior year or the first semester of the senior year, students must enroll in Classical Studies 480 and a 300-level corequisite course in the major. The corequisite course must cover general material on which the capstone is based.

A minor in Greek or Latin requires 18 hours, including at least 6 hours in the language at the 300-level or above. The remaining 12 hours may be selected from the following: courses in Greek or Latin (if they are in the language used to satisfy the language portion of the minor, they must be at the 300-level or above); courses in Classical Studies; History 271, 272; Visual Arts 204; Philosophy 210; and Government and Foreign Affairs 310.

A minor in Classical Studies requires 18 hours, at least 3 of which must be at the 300-level or above. Students may select from the following: any courses in Classical Studies; History 271, 272; Visual Arts 204; Philosophy 210; and Government and Foreign Affairs 310. Greek or Latin courses at the 200-level and above may also apply toward the 18-hour requirement, but this minor does not require language courses.

GREEK

GREEK 101-102. (3-3)
ELEMENTARY GREEK. A foundation course in the vocabulary, forms, and grammar of classical Greek, preparing the student to read standard authors. Emphasis is given to the development of the student's command of English by comparative and contrastive exercises and to the appreciation of Greek cultural values by close study of significant vocabulary. Prerequisite for 101: none; prerequisite for 102: Greek 101, or placement by the department. Offered: 101 in the fall semester; 102 in the spring semester.

GREEK 201-202. (3-3)
INTERMEDIATE GREEK. A continuing study of grammar and vocabulary is integrated with the reading and analysis of unadapted prose and verse. Prerequisites: Greek 101-102. Offered: 201 in the fall semester; 202 in the spring semester.

GREEK 301-302. (3-3)
MASTERPIECES OF GREEK LITERATURE. The selection of authors and texts is at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: Greek 202 or equivalent. Offered: 301 in the fall semester; 302 in the spring semester.

GREEK 303. (3)
THE GREEK BIBLE. Close study of passages from the Septuagint, the Synoptic Gospels, Acts, and perhaps some other books. Due attention is given to peculiarities of koiné Greek and to textual problems, especially those with theological implications. Prerequisites: Greek 201-202. Offered: on sufficient demand.

GREEK 401-408. (3 each semester)
ADVANCED READINGS IN GREEK LITERATURE. These courses are devoted to intensive study of individual authors such as Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Plato, Aristotle, Thucydides, Aristophanes, Menander, or to literary genres such as epic poetry, lyric poetry, philosophy, biblical literature. Offered: on sufficient demand.

GREEK 411. (3)
GREEK COMPOSITION AND GRAMMAR. Prerequisite: a third-year Greek course or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered: on sufficient demand.

LATIN

LATIN 101-102. (3-3)
ELEMENTARY LATIN. This course is designed for students with no previous experience with Latin. The text is written for adults; the sentences and drill exercises in forms and syntax are based on classical authors. Considerable emphasis is placed on expanding the student's vocabulary and grasp of language structure. Prerequisite for 101: none; prerequisite for 102: Latin 101, or placement by the department. Offered: 101 in the fall semester; 102 in the spring semester.

LATIN 201-202. (3-3)
INTERMEDIATE LATIN. Reading and analysis of selections from Latin prose and verse, and a continuing study of grammar and vocabulary. Prerequisites for 201: Latin 101-102, or equivalent; for 202: Latin 201, or equivalent. Offered: 201 in the fall semester; 202 in the spring semester.

LATIN 301-302. (3-3)
MASTERPIECES OF LATIN LITERATURE. The selection of authors is at the discretion of the instructor. Prerequisite: Latin 202 or equivalent. Offered: 301 in the fall semester; 302 in the spring semester.

LATIN 401-408. (3 each semester)
ADVANCED READINGS IN LATIN LITERATURE. The courses are devoted to intensive study of individual authors such as Lucretius, Tacitus, Livy, Ovid, Horace, or to literary genres such as Roman satire, elegiac poetry, epistolography, history. Prerequisite: a third-year Latin course or equivalent. Offered: on sufficient demand.

LATIN 411. (3)
LATIN COMPOSITION AND GRAMMAR. Prerequisite: a third-year Latin course or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Offered: on sufficient demand.

CLASSICAL STUDIES

Courses offered under the rubric of Classical Studies require no knowledge of Latin or Greek and do not carry language credit.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 201. (3)
ENGLISH ETYMOLOGY. A study of English words as derived from the classical languages. The purpose of the course is to broaden the student's vocabulary through a study of the historical development of an important element of the English language. No prior knowledge of Greek or Latin is presumed. Not open to freshmen.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 202. (3)
CLASSICAL MYTHOLOGY. A comprehensive survey of Greco-Roman mythology, with the aim of providing the student with a working knowledge of a significant element in Western culture and its creative achievements. Readings and lectures cover both the content of the mythology and its linguistic, archaeological, and anthropological significance. Offered: alternate spring semesters.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 203. (3)
GREEK LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. Reading and discussion of major works of classical Greek literature. Literary themes and techniques are considered, as well as the influence of Greek writings on later literature. No knowledge of Greek is required. Offered: fall semester.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 204. (3)
LATIN LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION. Reading and discussion of major works of classical Latin literature. Literary themes and techniques are considered as well as the influence of Latin writings on later literature. No knowledge of Latin is required. Offered: spring semester.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 301. (3)
HUMANISM IN ANTIQUITY. An intellectual history of the ancient world, ranging from Hesiod's Theogony-an account of the genesis of the Greek Gods-to Boethius, the man who undertook to synthesize Plato and Aristotle. Readings include works by major figures, like Herodotus, Plato, and Augustine, as well as some by minor figures, like Minucius Felix and Basil. Emphasis is placed on such questions as what the ancients meant by "happiness," "human," and "nature," and how their views developed under paganism and Christianity. Prerequisite: Any of the following: Western Culture 101; History 271, 272; Latin or Greek at the 200-level or above; any Classical Studies course; or permission of the instructor. Offered in spring semester of alternate years.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 302. (3)
THEMES IN THE CLASSICAL TRADITION. A study of Greek and Roman themes in the ancient world and in Western and other cultures. The course may focus on a genre (e.g., epic), character (e.g., Hercules), theme (e.g., revenge), location (e.g., Olympia), or idea (e.g., progress). Students study a variety of materials, which may include literature, art, music, and film. Prerequisite: Any Classical Studies course or permission of the instructor. Offered in rotation with Classics 301 and 303.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 303. (3)
LIFE IN THE ANCIENT WORLD. A study of the material life of the ancients that focuses on the way people lived and confronted their environment. Topics may include both the humdrum artifacts of everyday life and the grand religious and political monuments left by the great civilizations, as well as ancient trade and agriculture, plagues and famines, city-planning, and engineering. Materials studied include those in the literary, epigraphic, archaeological, and artistic record. Prerequisite: Any Classical Studies course or permission of the instructor. Offered in rotation with Classics 301 and 302.

CLASSICAL STUDIES 480. (1)
CAPSTONE SEMINAR FOR CLASSICAL STUDIES, LATIN, LATIN AND GREEK, AND GREEK MAJORS. In this course, students engage a special topic in their specific major and select individual research topics on which to do guided independent work resulting in a substantial critical research paper. Students are normally expected to complete this course in the spring of the junior year or the fall of the senior year. Corequisite: Any junior or senior level course in Classical Studies, Latin, or Greek. Offered: each semester.

HISTORY 271. (3)
GREEK HISTORY. An historical survey of the cultural, political, economic, and social aspects of Greek civilization to the time of the late Roman Empire. This course does not assume a knowledge of Greek and does not satisfy any of the language requirements. It carries credit toward a History major. Offered: fall semester of even-numbered years.

HISTORY 272. (3)
ROMAN HISTORY. A comprehensive survey of the rise and decline of Rome as a world-state and as the matrix of subsequent Western civilization. Primary emphasis is placed on the social, political, economic, and diplomatic forces in the evolution of Roman supremacy in the Mediterranean. This course does not assume a knowledge of Latin and does not satisfy any of the language requirements. It carries credit toward a History major. Prerequisite: none. Offered: spring semester of odd-numbered years.

LINGUISTICS 301. (3)
DESCRIPTIVE LINGUISTICS. An introduction to the techniques, findings, and insights of modern linguistics, "the most scientific of the humanities and the most humane of the sciences." Special attention is given to developing analytical appreciation of contemporary American English, on which most of the class exercises are based. A general course for all those interested in the nature of language. Prerequisite: sophomore or higher standing. Offered: on sufficient demand.

LINGUISTICS 302. (3)
HISTORICAL LINGUISTICS. Thorough study of the comparative method of linguistic reconstruction, and of modern views of the nature of linguistic evolution. Each student is required to do practical, independent work in a language of his competence, which may be English. Prerequisite: Linguistics 301 or English 259. Offered: on sufficient demand.

updated 7/10/14