Dr. James A. Arieti


Thompson Professor of Classics
Maples, 5
(434) 223-6252
jarieti@hsc.edu

Education

Ph.D., Stanford University, 1972 M.A., Stanford University B.A., Grinnell College, 1969, Phi Beta Kappa

Personal:
Has taught at Hampden-Sydney College since 1978. Previously he taught at Stanford University, The Pennsylvania State University, and Cornell College. He is married to Barbara Arieti, a guidance counselor at Prince Edward County Elementary School, and is the father of two children, Samuel and Ruth, and the grandfather of one grandchild, Josephine. 

Teaching Interests:
Greek, Roman, and biblical literature and philosophy; ancient history; humanities; the classical tradition. 

PhiloctetesService to the College:
He has served on and chaired innumerable committees; has been the chair of the Humanities Program and of the Classics Department; he founded and served as coach of the College Bowl Team; has served as a Freshman advisor. He organized and directed four interdisciplinary symposia with the participation of scholars from across the nation-Science and Mathematics: Definitions Ancient and Modern; Chaos: Ancient and Modern; Oedipus the King, and The Trojan War.

Honors and Awards:
Among his honors are membership in Phi Beta Kappa, Eta Sigma Phi, and Phi Alpha Theta. He has been a Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a Stanford University Fellow, and a National Endowment for the Humanities Fellow. He received the John Templeton Prize for Science and Religion in 1996. At Hampden-Sydney College he has received the Mettauer Research award three times, and, in 1995, he was awarded the Graves H. Thompson Chair.

OedipusPublications and Professional Activity:
He is the author of ten books, The Dating of Longinus (1975), Love Can Be Found (1975), Longinus's On the Sublime: Translation and Commentary (1985), Interpreting Plato: The Dialogues as Drama (1991), Discourses on the First Book of Herodotus (1995), Sophocles' Philoctetes (2000), The Scientific and the Divine: Conflict and Reconciliation from Ancient Greece to the Present (2003), Philosophy in the Ancient World: An Introduction (2005), Plato's Gorgias (2007), and Plato's Protagoras (2010). He has edited three other books, Hamartia: The Concept of Error in the Western TraditionEssays in Honor of John M. Crossett (1983), The Modern Language Association International Bibliography. Volume III: Linguistics (1975), and a machine-readable text of Cicero's De Amicitia edited for computer with coding for diacritics, punctuation, capitals (1973). He has delivered over ninety papers at professional conferences, colleges, and universities in North America and Europe and has published nearly forty articles on subjects that include ancient warfare, Dante, Empedocles, Greek athletics, Herodotus, Homer, Horace, Livy, Machiavelli, Philo, Plato, the Septuagint, and Shakespeare. His doctoral dissertation dealt with the Septuagint, the translation of the Hebrew Bible into Greek. He is currently at work on a project on biblical and classical cultures.