Physics

Transferable skills that Physics and Astronomy majors develop
Students studying Physics and Astronomy acquire many skills that can easily transfer to any subject matter:

Defining research problems  
Utilizing math formulas, real-life math skills
Designing equipment
Visualizing complex ideas
Formulating equations
Developing web pages
Analyzing data and error
Developing research models
Establishing hypotheses
Numerical modeling
Using lasers and optics
Interfacing computers with instrumentation
Evaluating ideas
Seeing relationships among factors
Drawing meaningful conclusions
Communicating technically, both orally and written  
Identifying/classifying materials

Possible job titles for Physics majors: 
Aerodynamist
Architect
Astronomer
Astrophysicist
Attorney
Ballistics Expert
Computer Systems Engineer
Engineer
Environmental Analyst
Medical Physicist
Meteorologist
Patent Examiner
Photo-optics technician
Physicist
Professor
Research Scientist
Seismologist 
Teacher
Technical Writer

Types of employers:
Airports 
Atomic & Nuclear Laboratories
Business & Industry 
Educational Institutions
Engineering Firms 
Government Agencies
Hospitals 
Manufacturing and Processing Firms
Mining Companies 
Museums
Nuclear Plants 
Petroleum Companies
Profession/Technical Journals 
Publishing Companies
Research-and-Development Firms 
Utilities Companies 
Weather Bureaus and Companies

Visit the H-SC Physics and Astronomy Department website or catalogue!

Other sources of information
Career counselors, alumni, and faculty members are great resources. Visit Career Education early and often, and talk to professors in your major and related fields. Career Coaches can help connect you with alumni in career fields that interest you for informational interviews. Professional associations are excellent sources of career and employment information, and many of them have websites.  Contact the following organizations and websites for more information:

American Institute of Physics

American Astronomical Society

National Academy of Sciences

Science: Next Wave

Science Careers