College Songs and Insignia

GLASS OF THE FINEST

Here’s to old Hampden-Sydney,
A glass of the finest,
Red ruby, Rhenish filled up to the brim!
Her sons they are many,
Unrivaled by any,
With hearts o’erflowing we will sing this hymn

Rah! Rah! H-S Rah! Our old Alma Mater’s sons we are; We will herald the story, And die for the glory, For Red and Grey are ever waving high.

As frosh we explore her, As sophs we adore her, And carve our names upon her ancient wall; As juniors patrol her, As seniors extol her, We’ll trust Alma Mater’s power in all.

Rah! Rah! H-S Rah! Our old Alma Mater’s sons we are; We will herald the story, And die for the glory,

For Red and Grey are ever waving high.

THE HAMPDEN-SYDNEY HYMN

Here’s to old Hampden-Sydney, The Garnet and the Grey And her sons by the thousands Who revere her name today;

Our old alma mater, We’ll e’er be true to thee And we’ll spread with song and story The fame of H-SC!

THE COAT OF ARMS OF HAMDPEN-SYDNEY COLLEGE


The Hampden-Sydney College Achievement of Arms

The Hampden-Sydney coat of arms was commissioned as part of the bicentennial celebration of the College. It was granted by the Royal College of Arms and presented to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth Ⅱ on October 19, 1976 by Mr. John Brooke-Little, Richmond Herald of Arms.

A coat of arms is a design (“device”) placed on a shield to identify the bearer. The College’s device displays elements from the arms of the two English patriots for whom the College is named. The eagles on gold fields are from John Hampden’s arms. The pheons (broad arrows) on silver fields are from the arms of Algernon Sydney.

The Hampden and Sydney quarters are separated by a red saltire (St. Andrew’s Cross), representing the Church of Scotland and the Presbyterian roots of the College. At the center is an open book with the motto in Greek “You shall know the truth,” from the Gospel of John where the promise continues, “and the truth shall make you free.”

In its most complete form, known as the “achievement of arms” and pictured above, the shield is held by two supporters. These two seventeenth-century gentlemen bear an interesting resemblance to Hampden and Sydney, although actual persons are not allowed to appear in heraldic achievements. Below each of the figures is a badge, represented as the open book supported by crossed staves topped with Phrygian caps, an ancient symbol of freedom. At the side of the supporters is the standard, bearing the College’s device and badges.

The shield is most commonly used without the supporters. When appropriate, it is used with an encircling ribbon bearing the name and founding date of the College.