Events Round Up at the Wilson Center

 

 

 


Military Leadership & National Security Studies Lecture

On January 24, the Military Leadership & National Security Studies Program hosted its annual dinner and lecture.  Faculty, staff, alumni and invited guests welcomed the newest class into the program.  The new class of sophomores who have declared a minor in Military Leadership were treated to a dinner followed by a lecture on why soldiers fight.  The panel of speakers included Lt. General Samuel Wilson, Lt. General Jerry Boykin and Dr. Alan Farrell - all former Green Berets and veterans of combat from the mountains of Burma, the jungles of southeast Asia to the deserts of the Middle East.  Over 190 students, guests, faculty and friends packed Crawley Forum to hear from these three highly decorated soldiers.  In addition, we were happy to have Lt. Colonel Patrick Howard address the audience.  Lt. Col Howard just returned from an extended tour in Afghanistan.

why

 gen sam

Lt. General Samuel Wilson (US Army ret)

"IF YOU HAD ASKED A WORLD WAR II DOG-FACE SOLDIER IN A FOXHOLE IN NORTH AFRICA, ITALY, FRANCE, THE SOUTH PACIFIC, THE CHINA-BURMA-INDIA THEATER--OR WHEREVER-- WHY HE WAS FIGHTING, YOU MIGHT WELL HAVE GOTTEN A BLANK LOOK POSSIBLY FOLLOWED BY A BRUSH-OFF, "YOU SOME KIND OF A JACKASS NUT OR SOMETHING?"  IF YOU COULD FINALLY GET HIM TO ANSWER , HE PROBABLY WOULD SAY SOMETHING LIKE--"LOOK...I JUST WANT TO GET THIS THING OVER WITH AND GO HOME."  THE PROFOUND ELEMENT IN THAT ANSWER IS IN THE "GO HOME" PART.  IT IS WHAT WAS AT HOME--AT LEAST IT WAS THERE WHEN HE LEFT IT, THAT HE WANTS TO GET BACK TO...THINGS THAT HE NEVER REALLY PUT IN WORDS--FAMILY, FRIENDS, A SWEETHEART, GOOD FOOD, A WARM BED, FUN AND LAUGHTER, SAFETY, COMFORT AND A REASONABLE PROSPECT OF SEEING TOMORROW'S SUN COME UP. "...I JUST WANT TO GET THIS THING OVER WITH AND GO HOME...AND THAT GUY OUT THERE IS STANDING IN THE WAY.  NOT ONLY THAT, BUT THE SONUVABITCH IS TRYING TO KILL ME..."



farrell

Dr. Alan Farrell (US Army ret)


jerry   Lt. General Jerry Boykin (US Army ret)

 

Current Events Series

snead  
        snead

                Lt. Col. Snead provided an overview of the 2013 Presidential Inauguration.  He covered a variety of topics, including the history, politics, planning, players, logistics, events, and security involved in presidential inaugurations.  In 2001, Lt. Col. Snead served as the Director for the Inaugural Parade as part of the Armed Forces Inaugural Committee.  There he planned, coordinated, and insured the successful execution of the parade involving  over 11,000 participants, 360 horses, and 16 floats that marched in honor of President George W. Bush.

 

   snead

 

Leadership Farmville - Trip to the General Assembly

 

leadership

leadership

leadership

 

 

 

 

 

 by Scott Clayton '13, Wilson Center Student Fellow

The Wilson Center has brought in many notable speakers.  Most recently, Dr. Peter Lawler of Berry College in Georgia gave an informative, as well as provocative, presentation on trends occurring in society: "Change We Can Actually See (And Half-Believe In)." Dr. Lawler began with a "narrative" based on the Founders' intent for a Lockean or classical individual rights-oriented framework for our society and government. This is an argument that is commonly discussed in today's polarized political scene. Many believe that Lockeans are currently in retreat; however, Lawler argued that it is the Progressives who are retreating. Dr. Lawler explained that America is inherently Lockean, making Progressivism an "imported alien theory." America is based on the personal liberties that are central to Locke's natural rights philosophy. Dr. Lawler went on to discuss the erosion of the "Welfare State." In his view, the US is moving from a system of defined benefits to a system of defined contributions. This signifies the break-down of old safety nets that were dependent on demographic projections that were never reasonable. The new state described by Lawler will be defined by extensive entrepreneurial activity. Such an entrepreneurial world will be filled with uncertainty; many people will not have a defined salary. In such a world, Dr. Lawler argued, people are concerned with saving what they already have. He added that this is a natural instinct that defines the attitudes and behavior of virtually all Americans, whether they consider themselves to be liberals or conservatives. Dr. Lawler specifically reviewed how society has changed in the past half century. We have become a society that is increasingly self-absorbed. Modern American society places a heavy premium on technology, which favors the young. This technology reinforces natural instincts, such as the prolongation of human life, which inevitably entails great costs-greater costs than the welfare state can bear. Dr. Lawler ended by stating that President Obama is not acting as a Progressive and is, in fact, acting in a conservative manner, that is, he is preoccupied with saving what Americans already have.

 


LAWLER

lawler crowd

 

 

 

 

Freshmen Leadership Program

"Cross-Generational Challenges for Millennials"

Hile Rutledge '89 

For the session with the Freshmen Leadership Program, Rutledge looked at the multiple generations from the perspective and through the 'lens' of Millennials.


 

Rutledge

crowd

 

 

"An Introduction to Intelligence and Its Role in National Security"

February 12

genSam

 

 

Dr. Paul Cantor

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Cantor   SHAKESPEARE:
PLAYWRIGHT OF THE GLOBE

During his lifetime, Shakespeare famously wrote for a
specific theater called the Globe. But today we can truly say that he has become the playwright of the globe. His name is known all over the world and his plays are staged and read everywhere. What is it about Shakespeare that made him history's only global playwright? How have his
plays so
completely transcended the limits of the specific theater for which they were created?

Dr. PAUL CANTOR is Clifton Waller Barrett Professor
of English and Comparative Literature at the University of
Virginia. He is the author of Shakespeare's Rome: Republic
and Empire and the Hamlet volume in the Cambridge
Landmarks of World Literature series, as well as essays
on Henry V, The Merchant of Venice, As You Like It, The
Tempest, Othello, Macbeth, and other Shakespearean
subjects.

 

THE APOCALYPTIC TURN IN POPULAR CULTURE

cantorWe survived the Mayan apocalypse, but to look at movies
and television today, we might as well be living in the late
Middle Ages. Everywhere the world seems to be coming to

an end. Vampires, werewolves, and zombies are overrunning
the American landscape, while alien invaders, comets, and
asteroids threaten us from the skies. The American dream
seems to have transformed into the American nightmare.
What does it tell us about our world that we are continually
bombarded with images of global catastrophe and
destruction?
Dr. PAUL CANTOR is Clifton Waller Barrett Professor
of English and Comparative Literature at the University of
Virginia. He is the author of Gilligan Unbound: Pop Culture
in the Age of Globalization, which was named by the LA
Times one of the best non-fiction books of 2001. His most
recent book is The Invisible Hand in Popular Culture: Liberty
vs. Authority in American Film and TV; it includes essays on
Deadwood, South Park, and alien invasion narratives.

cantor crowd

 

 

Dr. James Y. Simms Jr.
emeritus Professor of Russian and modern European history 

simms

"The struggle with Islamic terrorism: A marathon, not a sprint"

 

http://www.dailyprogress.com/opinion/guest_columnists/article_8c25846a-7e7a-11e2-a43e-001a4bcf6878.html