RHETORIC 101

RHET 101 01  Principles/Practice of Good Writing  
Nace, Nicholas D. | MWF 8:30 AM-9:20 AM
This course emphasizes basic sentence grammar-parts of speech, sentence types, sentence combining, and major errors in sentence construction-and the basic elements of composition-thesis development, paragraphing, and selection and organization of evidence. Students also develop vocabulary and reading skills. Prerequisite: consent of the Director of the Rhetoric Program.

RHET 101 02  Principles/Practice of Good Writing  
Schooling, Shawn H. | TR 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
This course emphasizes basic sentence grammar-parts of speech, sentence types, sentence combining, and major errors in sentence construction-and the basic elements of composition-thesis development, paragraphing, and selection and organization of evidence. Students also develop vocabulary and reading skills. Prerequisite: consent of the Director of the Rhetoric Program.

RHET 101 03  Principles/Practice of Good Writing  
Weese, Katherine J. | TR 10:00 AM-11:20 AM
This course emphasizes basic sentence grammar-parts of speech, sentence types, sentence combining, and major errors in sentence construction-and the basic elements of composition-thesis development, paragraphing, and selection and organization of evidence. Students also develop vocabulary and reading skills. Prerequisite: consent of the Director of the Rhetoric Program.

RHET 101 04  Principles/Practice of Good Writing  
Varholy-Simons, Cristine M. | MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM
This course emphasizes basic sentence grammar-parts of speech, sentence types, sentence combining, and major errors in sentence construction-and the basic elements of composition-thesis development, paragraphing, and selection and organization of evidence. Students also develop vocabulary and reading skills. Prerequisite: consent of the Director of the Rhetoric Program.

RHET 101 05  Principles/Practice of Good Writing  
STAFF | TR 2:00 PM-3:20 PM
This course emphasizes basic sentence grammar-parts of speech, sentence types, sentence combining, and major errors in sentence construction-and the basic elements of composition-thesis development, paragraphing, and selection and organization of evidence. Students also develop vocabulary and reading skills. Prerequisite: consent of the Director of the Rhetoric Program.

RHETORIC 102

(RHET 102 also counts toward the Rhetoric minor)

RHET 102 01 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
STAFF | TR 10:00 AM-11:20 AM
In this course students learn and practice the skills they need to write well. The course emphasizes reading, clear thinking, composing, revising, and editing, and in the process prepares students for other courses that demand careful reading, thinking, and writing. The course also provides a foundation of skills necessary to pass the Rhetoric Proficiency Examination. Prerequisite: for Rhetoric 101, none; for Rhetoric 102, Rhetoric 101 or consent of the Director.

RHET 102 02 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Cockrum, Allyson Abbott Williams | TR 12:30 PM-1:50 PM
Place, Conflict and Identity
In this course we will explore the relationship between place and identity, a relationship that one might describe as symbiotic: sometimes place and identity prove mutually beneficial; other times the two struggle against one another as in a competition. We will begin our study with that place we each call home, looking at its influence on the formation of our identity. Leaving home behind, we will venture to places both near—a city center and a countryside—and far—divided places of the past and today, in particular, Palestine and Israel, Northern Ireland, East and West Germany. In such places we will look at how identity can construct walls literally and figuratively. From the writers and artists who have occupied these places and who have claimed that their experiences in these places formed their identities, you will gain a greater understanding of the power of place. As you respond to their works—their poems, essays, short stories, and visual art—you will hone your research skills, refine your writing style, and develop rhetorical and analytical skills. 

RHET 102 03Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Florczyk, Steven | MWF 1:30 PM-2:20 PM
Hemingway
One of the most well-known authors of the twentieth century, Ernest Hemingway became famous not only as a writer but also for exploits such as involvement in wars, African safaris, and big game fishing. In short, Hemingway was a celebrity. For many, his life and literature came to epitomize what it means to be a man in the modern world. Even though Hemingway has sometimes been identified with a crude hyper-masculinity that has been both idealized and criticized, Hemingway’s writing suggests more complex themes on both men and women. As Andre Dubus III writes, most of Hemingway’s characters “are wounded, psychologically fragile, and deeply aware of death, but they’re trying to discover how to live anyway, which is a kind of heroism, but without the swagger.” What can we learn by studying Hemingway? With attention to style and effective sentences, students will improve their writing by producing research-based argumentative essays on one of the most influential writers in modern times.

RHET 102 04 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Florczyk, Steven | MWF 11:30 AM-12:20 PM
Hemingway
One of the most well-known authors of the twentieth century, Ernest Hemingway became famous not only as a writer but also for exploits such as involvement in wars, African safaris, and big game fishing. In short, Hemingway was a celebrity. For many, his life and literature came to epitomize what it means to be a man in the modern world. Even though Hemingway has sometimes been identified with a crude hyper-masculinity that has been both idealized and criticized, Hemingway’s writing suggests more complex themes on both men and women. As Andre Dubus III writes, most of Hemingway’s characters “are wounded, psychologically fragile, and deeply aware of death, but they’re trying to discover how to live anyway, which is a kind of heroism, but without the swagger.” What can we learn by studying Hemingway? With attention to style and effective sentences, students will improve their writing by producing research-based argumentative essays on one of the most influential writers in modern times.

RHET 102 05 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Cockrum, Allyson Abbott Williams | MWF 1:30 PM-2:20 PM
Place, Conflict and Identity
In this course we will explore the relationship between place and identity, a relationship that one might describe as symbiotic: sometimes place and identity prove mutually beneficial; other times the two struggle against one another as in a competition. We will begin our study with that place we each call home, looking at its influence on the formation of our identity. Leaving home behind, we will venture to places both near—a city center and a countryside—and far—divided places of the past and today, in particular, Palestine and Israel, Northern Ireland, East and West Germany. In such places we will look at how identity can construct walls literally and figuratively. From the writers and artists who have occupied these places and who have claimed that their experiences in these places formed their identities, you will gain a greater understanding of the power of place. As you respond to their works—their poems, essays, short stories, and visual art—you will hone your research skills, refine your writing style, and develop rhetorical and analytical skills. 

RHET 102 06  Principles/Practice of Good Writing  
Euteneuer, Jacob | TR 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
Play and Games, Writing and Research
Effective writing and communication skills help us better express our ideas and beliefs in all areas of our lives. One area of our life that modern technology has greatly expanded is our capacity to play games with anyone, anywhere. As digital games continue to become more accessible to wider audiences through mobile phones, subscription services, and simplified game engines, their impact and influence will continue to grow. Through a series of written essays, students will take a critical look at games and play, analyzing how digital games are made, who plays them, what stories they tell, and what makes the medium of games unique. Building off of the skills learned in RHET 101, students will perform rhetorical analysis, exercises in style, and academic research into how games depict, critique, and reinforce ideals related to race, gender, class, and sexual orientation. Ultimately, students will gain the ability to effectively integrate and cite research in order to craft persuasive and expressive arguments.

RHET 102 07  Principles/Practice of Good Writing  
Conceatu, Marius | TR 12:30 PM-1:50 PM
“Be yourself!”, they say. But how will I know how to do that when I have trouble being with or by myself? Some need to be around people and noise in order to avoid confronting their thoughts, fears, doubts, and other emotions. For others, true creativity and productivity are possible only in solitude. Being alone and liking it is often considered extreme behavior. Those who like being by themselves can be misunderstood, since license for aloneness is reserved for geniuses, eccentrics, and hermits. During a pandemic that has forced us to limit our physical interactions or even isolate from others, let us reexamine what thinkers, authors, and artists have pondered for a long time: the benefits and inconveniences of being alone. Through a variety of fiction and non-fiction pieces, we will gain an understanding of other authors’ experience of loneliness, aloneness, solitude—and of the differences between these states—and discuss how these authors write about themselves. Building upon the bases laid by Rhetoric 101, the course continues to help you develop well-argued essays, conduct research, and hone your own personal style through the study and practice of rhetorical strategies and stylistic devices.

RHET 102 09 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Buckley, Emmett | TR 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
In Rhetoric 102, we will build on the grammatical foundation established in Rhetoric 101 and continue developing a sense of our own style as writers. We will work on documenting our sources clearly and communicating persuasively in researched essays. In our essays, we will consider writing (along with other media) that is concerned with the natural world. We will look at the work of scientists, journalists, essayists, nature documentarians, and climate activists. What kinds of arguments do they make, and how should we respond to them? How do different ideas about nature lead to different arguments about how people should interact with it? What conceptions of nature do we need to discard or adopt? How (and why) should we argue with those who are unconvinced by overwhelming evidence? We will spend time considering these questions and more, all while managing information with a developing sense of rhetorical style.

RHET 102 10 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Buckley, Emmett | TR 10:00 AM-11:20 AM
In Rhetoric 102, we will build on the grammatical foundation established in Rhetoric 101 and continue developing a sense of our own style as writers. We will work on documenting our sources clearly and communicating persuasively in researched essays. In our essays, we will consider writing (along with other media) that is concerned with the natural world. We will look at the work of scientists, journalists, essayists, nature documentarians, and climate activists. What kinds of arguments do they make, and how should we respond to them? How do different ideas about nature lead to different arguments about how people should interact with it? What conceptions of nature do we need to discard or adopt? How (and why) should we argue with those who are unconvinced by overwhelming evidence? We will spend time considering these questions and more, all while managing information with a developing sense of rhetorical style.

RHET 102 11 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Malyszek, Chelsie | MWF 9:30 AM-10:20 AM
The Seasons
This course will bring you all four seasons in one semester. While we will necessarily start with winter, we will focus too on spring, summer, and fall. We will read essays, short stories, poems, and novels about the seasons, and even experience seasons through music and visual art. We will explore not only how the seasons transform our literal surroundings, but also how they inspire us to notice details, look for signs of change, and celebrate time passing. As we watch the seasons turn, you will turn into a seasoned writer by developing your skills in writing researched essays and by refining your writing style. Each week, we will focus on new tools to refine this style—tools like sentence rhythm, emphasis, and variety; proper research and citation, using the logic of persuasion, and finding the right words.

RHET 102 12 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Malyszek, Chelsie | MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM
The Seasons
This course will bring you all four seasons in one semester. While we will necessarily start with winter, we will focus too on spring, summer, and fall. We will read essays, short stories, poems, and novels about the seasons, and even experience seasons through music and visual art. We will explore not only how the seasons transform our literal surroundings, but also how they inspire us to notice details, look for signs of change, and celebrate time passing. As we watch the seasons turn, you will turn into a seasoned writer by developing your skills in writing researched essays and by refining your writing style. Each week, we will focus on new tools to refine this style—tools like sentence rhythm, emphasis, and variety; proper research and citation, using the logic of persuasion, and finding the right words.

RHET 102 13 Principles/Practice of Good Writing    
Cockrum, Allyson Abbott Williams | MWF 2:30 PM-3:20 PM
Place, Conflict and Identity
In this course we will explore the relationship between place and identity, a relationship that one might describe as symbiotic: sometimes place and identity prove mutually beneficial; other times the two struggle against one another as in a competition. We will begin our study with that place we each call home, looking at its influence on the formation of our identity. Leaving home behind, we will venture to places both near—a city center and a countryside—and far—divided places of the past and today, in particular, Palestine and Israel, Northern Ireland, East and West Germany. In such places we will look at how identity can construct walls literally and figuratively. From the writers and artists who have occupied these places and who have claimed that their experiences in these places formed their identities, you will gain a greater understanding of the power of place. As you respond to their works—their poems, essays, short stories, and visual art—you will hone your research skills, refine your writing style, and develop rhetorical and analytical skills. 

RHETORIC MINOR COURSES IN ADDITION TO 102

RHET 210 01  Public Speaking         
Deal, Claire E. | TR 8:30 AM-9:50 AM
Students enrolled in this course study the art of speaking in public. Students develop their abilities in the following areas: invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery. Emphasis is placed on learning the skills involved in speaking intelligibly, forcefully, and persuasively to an audience. During the course of the semester each student delivers four speeches. In addition, he critiques his own work and the work of his peers; he also analyzes several videotaped speeches from the “Great Speeches” series. He writes a mid-term examination that tests his knowledge of the principles of public speaking and his ability to analyze speeches. His final grade in the course reflects both his oral and his written work. Prerequisite: none. A good person is a good citizen, and a good citizen is an ethical, confident speaker. Rhetoric 210 introduces students to the art of public speaking and civil discourse. Emphasis is placed on crafting intelligent and compelling arguments that unite, rather than divide, an audience. Over the course of the semester students deliver informative and persuasive speeches that incorporate foundational rhetorical techniques, theories, and figures of speech. In addition, students critique their own work and the work of their peers. Students’ final grades in the course reflect both oral and written work.

RHET 210 02  Public Speaking         
Gleason, Sean Philip | TR 12:30 PM-1:50 PM
In Rhetoric 210, students will study and practice the art and science of public address. Through an examination of the five classical canons of rhetoric, students will learn the skills needed to speak intelligibly, forcefully, and persuasively to an audience.  At the completion of the course, students should be able to: 

  • use rhetorical principals to advance civic dialogue in conjunction with H-SC’s mission to form good men and good citizens 
  • demonstrate a working knowledge of rhetorical principles such as invention, disposition/arrangement, style, memory, and delivery
  • practice honing these rhetorical principals through exercitatio (trans., imitation) in accordance with the progymnasmata 
  • demonstrate an awareness of audience and occasion in speech preparation and delivery
  • develop a topic fully and effectively using the Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
  • research and present evidence to support claims
  • employ appropriate use of eye contact, gestures, and vocal expression when speaking
  • critically review their own and their classmates’ speeches
  • analyze and respond to live and recorded speeches
  • employ methods for reducing speech anxiety and techniques for improving listening

RHET 210 03  Public Speaking         
Gleason, Sean Philip | TR 2:00 PM-3:20 PM
In Rhetoric 210, students will study and practice the art and science of public address. Through an examination of the five classical canons of rhetoric, students will learn the skills needed to speak intelligibly, forcefully, and persuasively to an audience.  At the completion of the course, students should be able to: 

  • use rhetorical principals to advance civic dialogue in conjunction with H-SC’s mission to form good men and good citizens 
  • demonstrate a working knowledge of rhetorical principles such as invention, disposition/arrangement, style, memory, and delivery
  • practice honing these rhetorical principals through exercitatio (trans., imitation) in accordance with the progymnasmata 
  • demonstrate an awareness of audience and occasion in speech preparation and delivery
  • develop a topic fully and effectively using the Ethos, Pathos, and Logos
  • research and present evidence to support claims
  • employ appropriate use of eye contact, gestures, and vocal expression when speaking
  • critically review their own and their classmates’ speeches
  • analyze and respond to live and recorded speeches
  • employ methods for reducing speech anxiety and techniques for improving listening

RHET 301 01  Creative Nonfiction    
Nace, Nicholas D. | MWF 9:30 AM-10:20 AM
This course is a combination of workshop and seminar that will help students refine their writing skills while learning about various nonfiction genres. In addition to composing their own original nonfiction pieces, students will also read and analyze a sampling of so called “creative nonfiction” in order to discover how one writes most effectively about complex issues and how writers develop a personal style and voice.

RHET 310 01  Advanced Public Speaking                 
Deal, Claire E. | MW 12:30 PM-1:50 PM
This course, which builds on the foundations students acquire in Rhetoric 210, further develops students’ ability to engage thoughtfully and persuasively in public discourse by crafting and delivering persuasive arguments geared to specific audiences and occasions. Through extensive study of both classical and contemporary rhetorical techniques and theories, students learn to analyze rhetorical situations; to evaluate and incorporate evidence; to recognize and avoid fallacies in reasoning; to use inclusive, evocative, and effective language; and to deliver challenging arguments with conviction. The presentation of an argument in a public forum outside of the classroom is an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: Rhetoric 210.

RHET 360 01  Topics in Rhetorical Traditions         
Florczyk, Steven | MWF 10:30 AM-11:20 AM
American Rhetoric
What is an American, and why would anyone want to be one? In this course, students will consider various representations of the American character. In what ways has this idea encompassed notions both appealing as well as disagreeable? To what extent has it inspired diversity while also suggesting uniformity? What are we to make of explanations of American identity seemingly at odds with each other? Are Americans content oxymorons, as Walt Whitman suggests: “Do I contradict myself? / Very well then, I contradict myself”? Through written and oral analysis and interpretation of rhetorical strategies employed to represent the American persona, students will explore how influential figures have shaped this concept over time, from the colonial period to the present, as well as across social boundaries, including race, class, and gender.

RHET 370 01  Rhetoric and Culture 
Euteneuer, Jacob Steven | TR 10:00 AM-11:20 AM
Games and Their Makers
In today's world, more people than ever have the opportunity to create and distribute content, art, and arguments. At the same time, we spend more time, money, and energy playing games than ever before. This class takes a dual approach to understanding how people make these persuasive objects and how people perceive them. First, it looks at the tools and contexts of making games and toys. Then, we will analyze how the limitations and the opportunities of the tools affect the process of making—who gets to make things, what people decide to make, and how people find and discover these things. Having both of these in hand, this class examines how play and games have shaped our culture and where things might go from here. Students in this course can expect to develop proficiency in several new digital tools and produce essays, projects and games detailing how those tools can be used to change how we see and think about the world.

RHET 481 01  Capstone for Rhetoric Minors            
Gleason, Sean Philip | W 8:30 AM-9:20 AM
Rhetoric minors H-SC have a passing familiarity with the method of loci, a traditional of mnemonic recall based upon the ancient Greek poet Simonides of Ceos. As a pedagogical tool, the method of loci helps an individual memorize material, but the core tenants of 1) elaborate encoding, 2) chunking, and 3) using examples that are “close to the life world” are lessons that benefit any rhetor. Thus, in this EL capstone course, students will propose an individual final project that applies this rhetorical “art of memory” to future goals, hobbies, or career aspirations. Although the course does include a common core reading list and assignment guidelines (notably an end of the semester presentation and live exam), students will create an individualized plan of study and final project. Students are assessed through four checkpoints wherein an individual must demonstrate mastery of his proposed topic in order to progress to the next module. Students are also assigned weekly reflection assignments to chart the progress they have made and solicit feedback from the instructor.